Posts Tagged ‘Other’

2,000,000

October 31, 2015

I thought it was pretty cool when this blog got 10,000 hits. Then it got 100,000 hits and I was amazed.

And now it has crept over 2,000,000 hits – WOW!

And all that from little old me.

Thanks very much for visiting and I certainly hope you have learnt a bunch of interesting stuff, wherever in the world you may be.

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”
– Mahatma Gandhi

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Happy Holidays

December 24, 2014

Thank you for learning about ‘A Bunch of Interesting Stuff’ throughout the year and I hope you have a happy and safe holiday.

Mr. Barlow.

50 metre Giant Squid

January 16, 2014

The largest giant squid ever found turned out to be ……..

giant-squid-hoax

…. A HOAX!!!

Reminds me of this awesome huge skeleton.

Learn more here.

Happy Holidays

December 25, 2013

Thank you for learning about ‘A Bunch of Interesting Stuff’ throughout the year and I hope you have a happy and safe holiday.

Mr. Barlow.

Photorealistic drawing skills

January 29, 2013

Prepare to be stunned by what Mark Crilley can do. At the beginning of this time-lapse video, he tears up a common playing card. Then he uses pencils, ink and paint to duplicate it. At the end, it’s almost impossible to tell the two apart.

More here.

Write Your Name with the Stars

December 20, 2012

A new site lets you play with galaxies, writing out any word or phrase using astronomical phenomena that happen to look like letters.

The fun webpage — My Galaxies — is part of the Galaxy Zoo, a citizen science project that enlists ordinary people to sift through data from Hubble and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to identify celestial objects. Launched in 2007, Galaxy Zoo has identified more than 250,000 new galaxies, most of which have remained undiscovered until now. Along with finding a plethora of objects in the night sky, Galaxy Zoo volunteers have spotted many oddly shaped galaxies, and a good deal resembling English letters and numbers.

Have fun here.

Where Christmas Lights Go To Die

December 18, 2012

Shijiao is a bustling town in China that just so happens to be the unofficial capital of dead and unwanted Christmas lights.

Nine million kilos of old Christmas lights make it through Shijao every year.

Why?

The answer: slippers. The plastic and rubber that is used in Christmas lights wiring can also be re-purposed into slippers and other materials in China. Hence, the demand. Basically, China has figured out how to capitalise and find new life in our seasonal decorations. People who recycle the Christmas lights, separate the plastic wrap that insulates the copper wire and sells it independently from each other. On one end you have copper (which is plenty valuable) and on the other side you have the reusable plastic. The process of getting there is not unlike panning for gold in the modern age. Learn more here.

Felix Baumgartner’s supersonic freefall

October 15, 2012

After flying to an altitude of 39,045 meters (128,100 feet) in a helium-filled balloon, Felix Baumgartner completed a record breaking jump for the ages from the edge of space, exactly 65 years after Chuck Yeager first broke the sound barrier flying in an experimental rocket-powered airplane. Felix reached a maximum of speed of 1,342.8 km/h (833mph) through the near vacuum of the stratosphere before being slowed by the atmosphere later during his 4:20 minute long freefall. The 43-year-old Austrian skydiving expert also broke two other world records (highest freefall, highest manned balloon flight).

More here, here or here.

10 great tricks to play on your friends

September 15, 2012

These tricks from Richard Wiseman look really neat, but you may have to go back and watch some of them over a couple of times to get them straight. I would advise playing these tricks on your friends one at a time, or your friend may end up completely shattered.

Liquid Droplet Collisions – Super Slow Mo

September 5, 2012

Collisions of liquid droplets create fluid sculptures that can be appreciated only when the action is captured by high-speed photography.